Young blood antiaging trial raises questions

It was one of the most mind-bending scientific reports in 2014: Injecting old mice with the plasma portion of blood from young mice seemed to improve the elderly rodents’ memory and ability to learn. Inspired by such findings, a startup company has now launched the first clinical t...

What doomed mammoths on a remote Alaskan island?

Scientists may have finally solved the mystery of when—and why—the mammoths on a remote Alaskan island died out. Once a part of the Bering land bridge that joined Alaska to Siberia, St. Paul Island lies more than 450 kilometers from both the Alaskan mainland and the nearest Aleutian isl...

Dispute over president’s age tears Pasteur Institute apart

Is 65 too old to stay at the helm of a major research center? That question is sowing division at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, Science has learned, and has plunged the 128-year-old institute, home to 1200 scientists and the place where HIV was first isolated, into a leadership crisis...

Test your smarts on performance enhancing technologies and the hazards of cloning!

Every Monday, The Science Quiz tests your knowledge of the week’s biggest science news stories. No matter how much you know, you’re still likely to learn something — give it a try! //published window.TrivluQuiz = window.TrivluQuiz || { onReady: ...

‘Junk DNA’ tells mice—and snakes—how to grow a backbone

Why does a snake have 25 or more rows of ribs, whereas a mouse has only 13? The answer, according to a new study, may lie in “junk DNA,” large chunks of an animal’s genome that were once thought to be useless. The findings could help explain how dramatic changes in body shape have occur...

New theory suggests female orgasms are an evolutionary leftover

Billy Crystal may have been shocked when Meg Ryan so effectively—and amusingly—faked an orgasm in a restaurant during the 1989 movie When Harry Met Sally, but surveys suggest only one-third of women are regularly fully aroused during intercourse. And although poor partner performance, p...

Top stories: A seal’s humpback savior, a nasal antibiotic, and a wolf that’s not really a wolf

Why did a humpback whale just save this seal’s life? At first it seemed like the usual clever attack. Several killer whales were trying to catch a Weddell seal that had taken refuge atop a drifting patch of Antarctic ice. The orcas swam alongside each other, creating a wave that k...

This bee lives on the edge—of an active volcano

They call it “the kill zone.” Just outside the Nicaraguan capital city of Managua, the Masaya volcano smokes as magma sloshes and bubbles near its surface. Clouds of noxious fumes and slow-cooling lava wipe out any traces of life. But when a team of scientists visited, they saw somethin...

Zika has gained a foothold in Florida but is unlikely to become widespread in the United States

It’s little surprise that the Florida Department of Health confirmed this morning that there’s a “high likelihood” that local transmission of Zika has occurred in the United States for the first time, says Anthony Fauci, head of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Dise...

U.S. mental health institute puts champion of basic science at the helm

Up to now, Joshua Gordon has split his career between working with patients with mental illness and mice designed to mimic that illness. But this fall, the neuroscientist and psychiatrist will take control of the $1.5 billion U.S. National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Bethesda, ...
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