Out-of-sync brain waves may explain why we get forgetful as we age

New research finds the timing of brain waves we make while sleeping may impact memory. iStock.com/Syldavia Out-of-sync brain waves may explain why we get forgetful as we age Our brains don’t rest when we sleep. Electrical waves ripple through our noggins as our neu...

People don’t trust driverless cars. Researchers are trying to change that

FORD MOTOR COMPANY People don’t trust driverless cars. Researchers are trying to change that This October, television and web viewers were treated to an advertisement featuring basketball star LeBron James taking a ride in a driverless car. At first, James—known for ...

Are we going too fast on driverless cars?

Are we going too fast on driverless cars? The automakers and high-tech companies spending billions of dollars on developing self-driving cars and trucks tout the idea that autonomous vehicles (AVs) will help create a safer, cleaner, and more mobile society. Politicians aren’t...

My children make me a better scientist

Robert Neubecker My children make me a better scientist When I turned 28 years old, midway through my Ph.D., my biological clock went “BRRRRING!” My rational self thought, “Hmm, not a good time. Fact A: I love research and want a career in academia. Fact B: There are...

Understanding graduate funding can be taxing

iStock.com/flavijus Understanding graduate funding can be taxing No one ever said grad school would be lucrative. And I don’t mean that no one ever said this to you—I mean no one ever spoke that sentence, period. It’s long been a given that grad school is a time to “...

Forty years later, Ebola survivors are still making antibodies to the lethal virus

Lab technician and Ebola survivor Sukato Mandzomba (front) worked with Peter Piot in 1976 and again in 2016. Heidi Larson Forty years later, Ebola survivors are still making antibodies to the lethal virus Forty years after the first documented Ebola outbreak, some o...

Pushing cells to self-destruct combats deadly fibrosis

An overgrowth of connective tissue (purple) characterizes fibrosis, shown here in the liver. SPL/Science Source Pushing cells to self-destruct combats deadly fibrosis Each year, millions of people suffer life-threatening scarring in their lungs, heart, and other org...

Ancient Asian cultures may have risen and fallen on the strength of monsoons

Houyuan Lu Ancient Asian cultures may have risen and fallen on the strength of monsoons About 3900 years ago, one of the biggest cradles of Bronze Age civilization fell apart. For unknown reasons, people fled the Indus Valley in what is today Pakistan and northwester...

Fracking linked to low-weight babies

Pollution from fracking in Pennsylvania may harm the health of developing babies who live nearby.  REUTERS/Les Stone Fracking linked to low-weight babies The extraordinary growth in fracking—the hydraulic fracturing of deeply buried shale rock to extract natura...

New York City’s bars are ‘unhealthy’ for your ears

mauritius images GmbH/Alamy Stock Photo New York City’s bars are ‘unhealthy’ for your ears Chances are that the last bar or restaurant you visited offered the same house special: sound. And lots of it. Now, a new study suggests that all that noise is doing more than ...
Hot